Wilderness Balloons - Pygmy Rabbit Edition

This is a special edition of my Wilderness Balloons series as it covers several balloons found outside of southern California. Specifically, this covers a series of balloons found in a remote area of Humboldt County, Nevada (near the Idaho border) while conducting Pygmy Rabbit surveys for the United States Bureau of Land Management.

Balloon 19 was a mylar "Happy Birthday" balloon along Nevada Highway 290 on the way in to our study area. To its credit, it was at least along the right-of-way of a paved road, so I guess it barely qualified for this project. Still, relative to the San Gabriel Mountains where most of the balloons are found, this was in the middle of nowhere and only a couple utility poles down the road from a perched Golden Eagle. The balloon was retrieved and properly disposed of.

Balloon 19 was a mylar "Happy Birthday" balloon along Nevada Highway 290 on the way in to our study area. To its credit, it was at least along the right-of-way of a paved road, so I guess it barely qualified for this project. Still, relative to the San Gabriel Mountains where most of the balloons are found, this was in the middle of nowhere and only a couple utility poles down the road from a perched Golden Eagle. The balloon was retrieved and properly disposed of.

Balloon 20 was another mylar "Happy Birthday!" balloon. Like all of the ones in this edition, it was located hours away from civilization. This one was located in shrub-steppe habitat along a gravel road. It was taken into custody and properly dealt with.

Balloon 20 was another mylar "Happy Birthday!" balloon. Like all of the ones in this edition, it was located hours away from civilization. This one was located in shrub-steppe habitat along a gravel road. It was taken into custody and properly dealt with.

Balloon 21 was a mylar "Congrats Grad!" balloon, apparently stopped on its wanderings by a cattle fence adjacent to a spring. This area was only accessible on-foot a little ways away from a 4WD-only two-track road. It was taken into custody and properly disposed of.

Balloon 21 was a mylar "Congrats Grad!" balloon, apparently stopped on its wanderings by a cattle fence adjacent to a spring. This area was only accessible on-foot a little ways away from a 4WD-only two-track road. It was taken into custody and properly disposed of.

About Wilderness Balloons

I see an unbelievable number of balloons in an unbelievable number of wild places during my forays. They are strung from brush and trees in remote wilderness and hanging from the legs of birds. Mylar balloons frequently cause wildfires when caught in power lines. Balloons are destructive trash and should never be released into the environment. For more information from the US Fish and Wildlife Service about this issue, read here (warning: graphic images of dead wildlife).

Map of All Wilderness Balloons